Start Interracial dating among teens jounals

Interracial dating among teens jounals

Intimate interracial relationships have long been considered indicative of the social distance between groups, a barometer for gauging race relations. "The Rise of Intermarriage: Rates, Characteristics Vary by Race and Gender." Qian, Zhenchao. "Breaking the Racial Barriers: Variations in Interracial Marriage Between 19." Demography 34(2):273-276. Let's get rid of those monsterous white guys that are evil itself. Why not just utalize the gallazillions of white sperm on reserve. They can be aborted in the womb and we can get an endless supply of white sex girls!

For example, while no more than 11 percent of the teens surveyed thought a white-and-Hispanic or white-and-Asian couple would be ostracized by their respective racial or ethnic groups, about one-quarter of those surveyed said that a white and a black student dating each other would face problems from other white or black students in school.

Given these figures, it's not surprising that Gallup reported that black students faced the highest rates of resistance from their parents over interracial dating of any group surveyed.

Indeed, teens seem rather blasé about the significance of interdating: Only about one-quarter (24 percent) of the teens surveyed by Gallup thought the United States would be better off if more people interdated, while 9 percent thought the country would be worse off.

However, the largest share—67 percent—thought an increase in rates of interdating would make no social difference at all.

Among students who had dated interracially, at least 90 percent each of white, Hispanic, or Asian students said their parents acquiesced to their relationship.

But only 59 percent of black students who had interdated said their parents were comfortable with their dating. "People's view of how things are going in terms of race relations in this country is really distinctively colored by their race," he says.

More than one-third (38 percent) of black students had dated a Hispanic, while 10 percent of black students had dated an Asian student.

Teens surveyed also had an overwhelmingly positive view of interracial dating.

While Yancey studied interdating habits among adults, the future of interdating can perhaps best be understood by studying the activities and attitudes of teenagers. A 1997 Gallup national survey of people ages 13 to 19—found that nearly two-thirds (64 percent) of black, Hispanic, or Asian teens who had ever dated and who attended schools with students of more than one race said they had dated someone who was white.

Younger people have historically been more open to racial integration and more positive about race relations than older people, according to Jack Ludwig, senior research director at the Gallup Poll in Princeton, N. (This poll is the latest comprehensive survey of U. teens on the topic of interracial dating.) Consistent with Yancey's findings for adults, only 17 percent of white students who had dated and attended integrated schools in this survey had dated a black person, while 33 percent had dated a Hispanic person and 15 percent had dated an Asian.

But a study by George Yancey, a sociologist at the University of North Texas, found that interdating today is far from unusual and certainly more common than intermarriage.